13 Risk Factors for Type 2 Diabetes

There are many reasons that a person may become insulin resistant, putting themselves at risk for developing Type 2 Diabetes (T2DM). The following are the 13 most common risk factors. This article is excerpted from Dr. Mona Morstein’s new book: Master Your Diabetes: A Comprehensive, Integrative Approach for Both Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes (Chelsea Green Publishing, 2017) and is reprinted with permission from the publisher.

13 RISK FACTORS FOR TYPE 2 DIABETES

1. Genetics

Unlike Type 1 Diabetes, which has a minor familial genetic connection, T2DM has an established genetic inheritance. A genetic risk factor essentially means that a person is more likely to develop a condition that his or her relatives had, especially if other factors are involved. Many medical conditions are genetically associated, including arthritis, autoimmune diseases, cardiovascular disease, cancers, and T2DM.

Luckily, genetics does not mean a person is guaranteed to develop diabetes; eating well and having a positive, active, healthy lifestyle can absolutely prevent the occurrence of the condition.

2. Overeating

Overeating is one of the biggest risk factors for developing diabetes. Overeating can easily cause someone to become overweight or, even worse, obese.

Jeans that are too tight

3. Central Obesity

When we discuss obesity and T2DM, we are mainly focusing on abdominal obesity, also known as truncal obesity and visceral fat. This is fat that is stored in the abdominal cavity around organs like the liver, pancreas, and intestines. This type of fat is worse for promoting insulin resistance than subcutaneous fat, which lies under the skin, or female fat around the hips and thighs. It is likely you have excess abdominal fat if your waist is more than 37 inches if you are male, and more than 35 inches if you are female. Simply put, abdominal obesity causes insulin resistance, which causes more abdominal obesity. And, insulin resistance causes abdominal obesity, which causes worsening insulin resistance. It’s a vicious cycle.

4. Nutritional Deficiencies

The body’s blood sugar–regulating metabolism requires many nutrients to work smoothly and healthily. Many people are deficient in these same nutrients. The CDC’s “Second Nutrition Report” showed that in the United States, the most common nutrient deficiencies are vitamin B6, iron, vitamin D3, vitamin C, and vitamin B12. The Journal of Nutritionreported that Americans are also not getting enough omega-3 fatty acids from their foods.

There are many reasons that a person may become insulin resistant, putting themselves at risk for developing Type 2 Diabetes (T2DM). The following are the 13 most common risk factors. This article is excerpted from Dr. Mona Morstein’s new book: Master Your Diabetes: A Comprehensive, Integrative Approach for Both Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes (Chelsea Green Publishing, 2017) and is reprinted with permission from the publisher.

Courtesy By: http://care2.com/

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